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« on: July 23, 2010, 05:22:05 AM »
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Last year, Ciggy created an Atlantis thread worthy of more attention, Seeking Atlantis Through Linguistics.

Articles that I've read on linguistics warn against relying too heavily on word list comparisons. These do not prove a relationship between two languages. Yeah, but they can't disprove a relationship, either. I don't doubt there are more things to learn about the evolution of languages.

Many of the languages on Ciggy's list and the addition by Kakha Margiani of Georgian, are agglutinative languages. Most, if not all, Native American languages are agglutinative types. Combine this with blood types and mtDNA haplogroup X, we have an interesting picture of possible relationships straddling the Atlantic.

Looking at sequences can be instructive. If Plato's story is to be our guide, then the children of Atlantis had something like 6,000 years to traverse Eurasia even before our own history began. The Basques may have lived there for 40,000 years, back to the Cro Magnon (early Atlantean?). Finns moved into Northern Europe from farther East. The Hungarians (Magyars) also came from the East. But could they have come from the West before that? The Turks, too.

MOST SENTIMENTALLY FAVORITE WORDS IN ANY LANGUAGE

So, what are the most sentimentally favorite words in any language? I would venture to guess "mother" and "father." Would these words tend to have greater persistence in a language group that confounded the rules of linguistic persistence? Could the Atlanteans have been cursed with the "Tower of Babel" effect — a tendency to change things in their language? One interpretation of the Basque province, Guipuzcoa, is the meaning, "we who's language has been broken," alluding to the Genesis incident concerning a confusion of tongues.

Like a rainbow, there is a gradual change in "mother" and "father" across Eurasia, within these agglutinative languages which supposedly have no relationship.

LanguageMotherFather
Basqueamaaita
Etruscan (Rasna)atiapa
Etruscan pantheongoddess Anagod Aita
Turkishanne, anababa, aba
Finnish (Suomi)δitiisδ
Hungarian (Magyar)anyaapa, atya
Sumerianamaada
Georgiandedamama
Chechennaanadaa
Dravidianammaappa[n]
Khmermah, m'daaypah, euv pohk
Mon??apa
Berber (Tamazight)anna, yemmaadda, abba

[continued on next ...]

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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 05:25:44 AM »
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[linguistics Revisited, continued...]

Some early linguists found affinities between Basque, Berber and Georgian. It's funny that the Iberian languages of the West should find a link to the Iberian languages of the Caucasus, but perhaps it shouldn't be surprising.

Look at Basque and Etruscan. It looks as though mother and father have been gender swapped. Yet, in the Etruscan pantheon there are a god and goddess with names matching by gender their counterparts in Basque for mother and father. And look at Georgian where mother is "deda" and father is "mama."

MOTHERS!

Why would there be a gender swap?

In many of the Native American tribes, especially along the Eastern seaboard of North America, are matriarchal or matrilineal. The Mon of Southeast Asia are matriarchal. Though the Basques were not matriarchal in the historical past, they have had strong women and their men do have their couvade (sympathetic pregnancy pains while their wives are in labor). Also, the Etruscans were despised by the Romans and the Greeks because they gave their women so much power. And wow! What a male chauvinistic point-of-view that is. What if it were the women who allowed the men to have power? What if, during the period of the Etruscan god and goddess, Aita and Ana (beginnings and endings), women transferred ruling power to the men, yet the terms stayed with the role rather than the gender. Therefore, men became the new "mothers" or "rulers."

In an A&E video on Atlantis narrated by Ted Danson, one researcher claimed that Plato's story was made up (a pure fiction) because there were no other versions of the Atlantis myth as there were for other Greek myths.

His assertion was full of holes. Why? For one, the story of Atlantis was a family story of Solon and friends, local only to Athens. Also, the story was a recent import from Egypt. It did not have the same opportunities to gain such variation. Or did it?

Consider the similarities between the story of Athena's birth and the story of Atlantis.

ATHENAATLANTIS
Athena's mother, Metis was the wisest individual of all time.Atlantis was the most advanced civilization of all time.
Metis was swallowed whole by ZeusAtlantis was swallowed whole by the sea
Athena was born full grownAtlantis refugees emerged as a fully mature culture
Athena was born fully armedAtlantis refugees took with them weapons and military skills

ATLANTIS MATRIARCHAL?

Both Metis and Athena were women. Could Metis have represented the latter years of Atlantis matriarchy? Could Athena have represented the matriarchal refugees?

Why didn't Plato or the Egyptian priest mention this "little" detail? It won't be the first time that a chronicler left out matriarchy because it offended their male sensibilities. Europeans discovered that many of the Native American tribes were matriarchal or matrilineal, yet conveniently omitted that fact from their reports in the 1600's.

Could it be that there was an alternate version of the Atlantis story already in Greece, awaiting Solon's delivery of a more complete story from Egypt?

This is just too interesting to keep to myself. Let's talk about this. What are your thoughts?

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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 02:57:36 PM »
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I think you've done good work here.  Plato's account attempts to characterize Atlantis as Patrilineal (sons of Atlas inheriting the kingship) but there is a curious mention of the gatherings of royal "couples" from the 10 kingdoms, which is also echoed by the Mayan legend of the kings of Xibalba, ruling as 5 "pairs" of kings.  One plausible explanation for this would be if Atlantis/Xibalba had a system where a King and a Queen as a married couple each ruled one of 10 provinces in the collective kingdom or "empire", that the annual gatherings of "the ten" (5 couples) would congregate and discuss policy for the wider kingdom as a whole.  That wouldn't make Atlantis "Matriarchal" so much as gender-balanced (if my speculation is correct).  Variations on this theme, leaning more one way or the other, may have cropped up in the "seed cultures" that were transplanted around the world after the destruction of Atlan/Atitlan, and it may have been more common for those cultures to lean more matriarchal--at least at first.

"By a route obscure and lonely, Haunted by ill angels only,
Where an Eidolon, named Night, On a black throne reigns upright,
I have reached these lands but newly From an ultimate dim Thule —
From a wild weird clime, that lieth, sublime, Out of Space — out of Time." --Edgar Allen Poe
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 02:59:45 PM »
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Come to think of it the Bock Saga has a similar organization of royal couples sharing power, although the numbering is different--possibly a transplanted custom from Atlantis as described of early Finnish culture (or a root culture that passed on to Finns as well as Atlanteans).

"By a route obscure and lonely, Haunted by ill angels only,
Where an Eidolon, named Night, On a black throne reigns upright,
I have reached these lands but newly From an ultimate dim Thule —
From a wild weird clime, that lieth, sublime, Out of Space — out of Time." --Edgar Allen Poe
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2010, 11:05:49 AM »
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Hello Carl, Doug and Ciggy.
I think that the insula Poseidia had been divide between eight kingdoms, 9-th kingdom situated on the Persephone's isles and 10-th kingdom on the Pluto and Ammon. 
six winged horses of the Poseidon are six river of the Insula Poseidia
Atlas Son of the Poseidon was first king of the Atlantis City kingdom.
Pre-flood Cartago was capital of the huge terrain around the Atlas mountain chains. first king of the terrain was another Atlas from the same  royal family of the Zeus and Poseidia (Greek translation Poseidon).
ancient pre-flood port and city Gadiz: Cαdiz - ( modern spain ) had been founded by Hades- third brother of the famous royal family (Zeus, Poseidia, Hades). Hades was first ruler of the Persephone's isles and ruler of the whole west European agriculture development. Wife of Hades was Persephone.
Real meaning is that: ancient pre-flood port and city Gadiz is founded by Gods. Name god entered in the European tribes by famous pre-flood port and city Gadiz.


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« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 10:37:47 AM by K.Margiani »
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2010, 01:39:58 PM »
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"God" here translates best to "King who was able to force people to worship him as God".

"By a route obscure and lonely, Haunted by ill angels only,
Where an Eidolon, named Night, On a black throne reigns upright,
I have reached these lands but newly From an ultimate dim Thule —
From a wild weird clime, that lieth, sublime, Out of Space — out of Time." --Edgar Allen Poe
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